John kennedy moon speech

In it, I endeavor to point out the elements which allow this speech to still resonate strongly over 60 years past its delivery. I am hard pressed to think of any other examples of rhetoric, be them spoken or written, by them persuasive or informative, which managed to achieve the goals intended for them in a manner similar to this speech.

He took advantage of the opportunity to deliver a speech to drum up support for the nation's space effort. Background[ edit ] When John F. Fourth, an additional 75 million dollars--of which 53 million dollars is for the Weather Bureau--will help give us at the earliest possible time a satellite system for world-wide weather observation.

Yet the vows of this nation can only be fulfilled if we in this nation are first, and, therefore, we intend to be first.

It is a classic example of powerful persuasion, of successful public speaking, and is clearly demonstrative of the remarkable things that a good, strong, well-constructed, and well-delivered speech is capable of.

Again, in the Cold War context, such a challenge was strongly appealing. He states that the American budget for space is going to increase dramatically, and, as such, the average American is going to need to pay more and more for space exploration efforts.

There are other points where his delivery succeeds. Lastly, he uses the first-personal plural "we" to represent all the people of the world that would allegedly explore space together, but also involves the crowd. Kennedy, it seems, goes through the effort to describe all this for two main reasons.

Kennedy whipped up support for NASA's fledgling Apollo program in a speech that contains perhaps the most famous words he ever uttered about space exploration. All this adds to the authoritative presence he has at the podium, a presence that is needed to make claims and goals as bold as those about which he spoke.

If we are not, we should decide today and this year. This decision demands a major national commitment of scientific and technical manpower, materiel and facilities, and the possibility of their diversion from other important activities where they are already thinly spread.

No single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind, or more important for the long-range exploration of space; and none will be so difficult or expensive to accomplish.

If we must land on the Moon in order to preserve a peaceful and free world, then landing on the Moon is an absolutely necessity. The first point Kennedy addresses in the body of his speech is the breakneck pace at which technology, knowledge, and discovery has evolved.

It means a degree of dedication, organization and discipline which have not always characterized our research and development efforts.

Kennedy's Famous 'Moon' Speech Still Stirs

There were many other things that the money could be spent on. Indeed, the United States, at the point of his speech, had only been sending men into orbit for less than 5 years.

JFK's 'Moon Speech' Still Resonates 50 Years Later

Ambitious visions of space exploration were proclaimed by Presidents George H. As we are quite familiar with in our contemporary political environment, telling people that they will be giving more to the state through taxes, especially for something that does not directly and tangibly impact their daily lives, is an unpopular action.

Third, an additional 50 million dollars will make the most of our present leadership, by accelerating the use of space satellites for world-wide communications.

Kennedy rightly recognized that no American living at the time could disagree with the premise that American liberty would be secured through supremacy over the Soviet Union.

John F Kennedy: Man on the Moon

Having completed the body of his speech, Kennedy thus begins his concluding remarks. While our primary concern is with foreign policy, Transmission is also a place for the ideas -- some serious, some irreverent -- that bubble up from our bureaus.

Change is happening and change is happening fast; it is inevitable that man will reach for the stars. Known already as a persuasive and eloquent speaker, Kennedy utilizes fully the public speaking skills he has throughout the extent of his speech.

Clearly then, in terms of content, the speech was a resounding success.

May 25, 1961: JFK's Moon Shot Speech to Congress

Now this is a choice which this country must make, and I am confident that under the leadership of the Space Committees of the Congress, and the Appropriating Committees, that you will consider the matter carefully.

Yet a speech is not only about content; if this was, it need only have been published as an op-ed or as an article. First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the Earth.

For space science, like nuclear science and all technology, has no conscience of its own. But all of you have lived through the last four years and have seen the significance of space and the adventures in space, and no one can predict with certainty what the ultimate meaning will be of mastery of space.

It spawned awe and fear and to this day is the source of myth and legend. Space is there and is to be conquered, the United States will do so to preserve peace and seek knowledge, and it will be the greatest adventure in which man, let alone the United States, has ever engaged.

Kennedy rightly recognized that no American living at the time could disagree with the premise that American liberty would be secured through supremacy over the Soviet Union. No single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind, or more important for the long-range exploration of space; and none will be so difficult or expensive to accomplish.

In it, I endeavor to point out the elements which allow this speech to still resonate strongly over 60 years past its delivery. But I think every citizen of this country as well as the Members of the Congress should consider the matter carefully in making their judgment, to which we have given attention over many weeks and months, because it is a heavy burden, and there is no sense in agreeing or desiring that the United States take an affirmative position in outer space, unless we are prepared to do the work and bear the burdens to make it successful.

When he met with Nikita Khrushchevthe Premier of the Soviet Union in JuneKennedy proposed making the Moon landing a joint project, but Khrushchev did not take up the offer.

Its new AdministratorJames E. John F. Kennedy Moon Speech Analysis Introduction "The federal government did indeed make Apollo a national priority, pouring an estimated $25 billion -- well over $ billion in today's money "-Mike Wall.

President John F. Kennedy's May 25, Speech before a Joint Session of Congress On May 25,President John F. Kennedy announced before a special joint session of Congress the dramatic and ambitious goal of sending an American safely to the Moon before the end of the decade. It was in this context that President John F.

Kennedy arrived at Boeing Airport in Seattle, Washington on November 16, to deliver a major foreign policy speech at the University of. Fifty years ago, on May 25,President John F. Kennedy gave a historic speech before a joint session of Congress that set the United States on a course to the moon.

John F. Kennedy — ‘We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.[Address at. On September 12th,President John F.

We choose to go to the Moon

Kennedy ascended a podium in front of a large crowd gathered at Rice University in Houston, Texas, and prepared to give a speech that would dramatically shape the direction of the United States’ efforts over the following decade.

John kennedy moon speech
Rated 3/5 based on 1 review
John F Kennedy: Man on the Moon - janettravellmd.com